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Author Topic: Bug out bags for infants.  (Read 2773 times)

Gungnir

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Bug out bags for infants.
« on: April 20, 2012, 08:34:13 PM »

This has been on my mind for a bit now. Basically it seems like an extended diaper bag. I got:
Diapers (disposable and cloth)
4 cans of formula (dumped into 8 bags and vacume sealed, i split them up so if one gets a whole only half a can could be wasted)
onsies and jumpers (from fitting sizes to larger then needed)
cloths and wet naps (i didnt pack to many since i figure at the rate babies grow old onies that they out grow on the road can become cloths with no added weight)
extra passifiers
and his security blankie and 2 stuffed animals are always near by
baby oragel
oval
baby tylanol


so with a month of formula, i can do him until he is on baby food but if you run out of formula, and breast milk isnt an option what are other choices??? are the other ways to feed babies in an emergency???? i remember watching a movie about a couple lost in the canadian arctic with an infent based on a true story. and learned babies can survive for sometime with out food on there baby fat alone so as the formula gets low i geuss you could water it down and add concentrated vitamins.
Also I was thinking on one of those slap chops or other hand operated small food processors. There light and compact and can turn people food into mushy baby food (or senior food  :P)
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2012, 08:35:05 PM »

My daughter was born seven weeks early and was small for her age. Even though she was healthy and strong for her size she had little fat on her, our doctor told us to feed her as much fat as we could. We ended up using Boost cut 50/50 with milk after our doctor suggested it. I don't know if there is a powder version or not, but if there is then cutting it 50/50 with powdered milk (the Mexican aisle around here has whole milk powder) would stretch things out.

I'd add some clothes pins and some string to make a clothes line with. The cloth diapers could even be clothes pinned to your pack to dry if need be.

Powder Pedialyte is probably a good thing to have as well.
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Grog

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2012, 10:14:30 AM »

Kids have little to no immunity, so it may be advisable to pack a digital thermometer and tailor a first aid/medical kit. Also some where include things like a small bottle of baby shampoo and gentle soap to help the tykes stay clean. Make sure the Mother has back up vitamins to maintain health, especially if still breast feeding. Some extra sleeping gear may be in order.

I realize that the bag has a finite limit, so there may need to be some cross loading. Also what about repair parts for baby carriers/packs?

Good post. Good ideas, Thanks for the topic.
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Greg B.

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2012, 07:54:04 PM »

Grog,
I respectfully disagree with you on the type of thermometer. I strongly recomend a low tech rectal thermometer, for pediatric use, post apocolyptic. If you can't get one at the pharmacy, check vet supplies. Same stuff as for people.

All the digital stuff, on the rock, aint gonna be worth a tinker's damn when the lights go out and they quit making batteries. I like to think low tech. No tech is even better.

Greg B.
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Grog

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2012, 10:42:13 PM »

Fair enough, however, depending on Who is taking care of the kids, ease of reading and knowing where it went to take the temp are key. Yes you could take temp oral, some kids do not do so well, now you have to consider going "South" versus "North. One of the good things about this site, we can agree to disagree, a (I think)Fairly good one was on the pluses and minuses for internal versus external pack frames. :) There is NOT ever any 1 perfect solution, If you have something better, Please Please Share. If I give old info, please Call Me On it and Share the alternatives! This is one of many reasons to get the right info out there, hopefully Ahead of time.

Thanks for sharing and for giving reasons as to why something does not seem to fit/ work. It can only make us better one and all, if not collectively.
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Gungnir

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2012, 05:45:20 PM »

i have a pocket sized solar battery charger
http://www.cabelas.ca/index.cfm?pageID=71&section=1186&section2=1268&ID=31872
im not sure how long it would last, but im sure it would defently last long enough to adjust a life style to include no technology.

now back on topic, I never thought of thermometers. Arnt oral and rectul thermometers the same thing? I think im still gonna pack a digital one, after all there cheap and the battery will usually last long enough until a child is out of the finiky age. I have read two things when it comes to kids and survival, one was to pack less then yummy food that is healthy so you dont accedently eat it all and then to pack yummy foods, after all anyone with a baby knows that the stress of a screaming child could possibly be your breaking point when also dealing with the stress of survival. Right now we are still on first stage formula food, and actually just started introducing baby cookies and some mushed stuff that looks like yellow vomit but taste like peaches :D (provided he makes me try it befor he tries instead of after ..... then it taste like peaches and slober) I think im gonna talior the food as he grows since he changes so fast, if hes happy with the basic very healthy flavorless foods then i will pack them, but if feeding himbecomes a nightmare regularly then im probably gonna back yummy foods.
Also as long as he can fit his jolly jumper (that is his main source of entertainment and leg development) i think im gonna bring that. Its under a pound, and fold up really small as long as i dont pack that clamp that attatches to the door frame. Instead i can just use parachord to attatch it to a tree.......
im also lucky that we already have a nice stroller with big wheels and a sturdy larger sized storage space under it that we bought for the trails out camping so a few of the extras arnt to much of a hassle to pack
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2012, 10:20:34 PM »

One thing to keep in mind with young kids (and old folks too) is that they can be really picky when it comes to food. There are times when they will simply refuse to eat if it isn't something they don't like, or if they have decided that they want something specific. Always pack things they like, and always pack some sort of nutritional supplement even if only vitamins that can be dissolved  in water or some other drink.
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Grog

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2012, 10:06:13 AM »

Oral and rectal thermometers are different and the temp varies a bit, for kids check with your care provider first. As to food, well nutrition first, but avoid Food Fatigue where it is the same thing over and over again to where even healthy people will not eat it, even if it is all that is available. As to recharging, I for one am not sure if the batteries for digital thermometers can be changed out or recharged, It may be something to take a look at.

From http://firstaid.webmd.com/body-temperaturehttp://firstaid.webmd.com/body-temperature gives:

Body Temperature
What is body temperature?

Body temperature is a measure of the body's ability to generate and get rid of heat. The body is very good at keeping its temperature within a narrow, safe range in spite of large variations in temperatures outside the body.

When you are too hot, the blood vessels in your skin expand (dilate) to carry the excess heat to your skin's surface. You may begin to sweat, and as the sweat evaporates, it helps cool your body. When you are too cold, your blood vessels narrow (contract) so that blood flow to your skin is reduced to conserve body heat. You may start shivering, which is an involuntary, rapid contraction of the muscles. This extra muscle activity helps generate more heat. Under normal conditions, this keeps your body temperature within a narrow, safe range.
Where is body temperature measured?

Your body temperature can be measured in many locations on your body. The mouth, ear, armpit, and rectum are the most commonly used places. Temperature can also be measured on your forehead.
What are Fahrenheit and Celsius?

Thermometers camera are calibrated in either degrees Fahrenheit (F) or degrees Celsius (C), depending on the custom of the region. Temperatures in the United States are often measured in degrees Fahrenheit, but the standard in most other countries is degrees Celsius.
What is normal body temperature?

Most people think of a "normal" body temperature as an oral temperature of 98.6F (37C). This is an average of normal body temperatures. Your temperature may actually be 1F (0.6C) or more above or below 98.6F (37C). Also, your normal body temperature changes by as much as 1F (0.6C) throughout the day, depending on how active you are and the time of day. Body temperature is very sensitive to hormone levels and may be higher or lower when a woman is ovulating or having her menstrual period.

A rectal or ear (tympanic membrane) temperature reading is slightly higher than an oral temperature reading. A temperature taken in the armpit is slightly lower than an oral temperature reading. The most accurate way to measure body temperature is to take a rectal temperature.
What is a fever?

In most adults, an oral temperature above 100F (37.8C) or a rectal or ear temperature above 101F (38.3C) is considered a fever. A child has a fever when his or her rectal temperature is 100.4F (38C) or higher.


http://www.babycenter.com/0_how-to-take-your-babys-temperature_11508.bc  http://www.babycenter.com/0_how-to-take-your-babys-temperature_11508.bc

How to take your baby's temperature
Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
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Highlights

    What's the best way to take my baby's temperature?
    Rectal thermometers
    Ear thermometers
    Under the arm
    Are there any other methods I can use?

What's the best way to take my baby's temperature?

For starters, you'll need a good digital thermometer, which you can find in drugstores for less than $10. Digital thermometers are easy to use, easy to read, and fast most give an accurate reading in ten seconds to two minutes.

If you still have an old-fashioned glass thermometer around the house, you'll want to dispose of it properly. (Check the yellow pages of your phone book to find your local household hazardous waste site.) These thermometers can shatter and leak dangerous mercury.

Some digital thermometers are specifically designed for use in the rectum, but most can be used rectally, orally, or under the arm. (If you take your baby's temperature using more than one method, you'll want to designate a thermometer for each.)

Digital ear thermometers, called tympanic thermometers, are usually more expensive and can only be used in the ear.

That leads to the question of where to put the thermometer to get the best reading: in the rectum, the ear, or the armpit. (Taking your child's temperature orally won't be an option until he's a little older.) Each method has advantages and disadvantages, so talk it over with your doctor to see which method she recommends for your baby.

Regardless of which method you use, don't take your baby's temperature right after he's had a bath, as it could affect his temperature. Wait at least 20 minutes after bath time for an accurate reading.
Rectal thermometers

Your doctor may ask you to take a rectal reading until your baby reaches 3 months of age. That's because an accurate reading is vital when your baby's little, and the rectal method consistently gives the most accurate results. Most of the research that your baby's doctor relies on to decide how to respond to a fever is based on rectal temperatures.

Some babies don't mind having their temperature taken rectally, while others just seem miserable being subjected to this procedure. If your baby protests, you might want to take his underarm (axillary) temperature first and then take his rectal temperature if the first reading is over 99 degrees Fahrenheit.

Here's how to use a rectal thermometer:

    Look for a rectal thermometer that has a flexible tip and a wide handle that doesn't let you insert it more than an inch. (If you were to accidentally insert the thermometer too far if your baby gets very squirmy, for example you could perforate your baby's rectum.)
    To prepare the thermometer, clean the end with rubbing alcohol or a little soap and warm water. Rinse with cool water. Then coat the end with a little petroleum jelly for easier insertion or use a disposable sleeve made for that purpose.
    Hold your baby on your lap, tummy down and bottom up, letting his legs dangle over the side of your thigh. Or place him on his back, either on the bed or on a changing table. Your baby may be more comfortable in the tummy-up position, since he's used to lying that way for diaper changes. Besides, you'll be better able to distract him if he can see your face.
    Press the thermometer button to turn it on. With your other hand, spread your baby's buttocks apart. Gently insert the bulb about half an inch to an inch (1.3 to 2.5 centimeters) into his rectum, or until the tip of the thermometer disappears.
    Keep a firm grip on his buttocks by cupping them with the palm and fingers of the hand that's holding the thermometer. Don't let go of the thermometer, or it may not stay in place if your baby starts wriggling.
    When the thermometer beeps, remove it and read your baby's temperature. Be aware that inserting anything into your baby's rectum can stimulate his bowels, so don't be surprised if he poops when you take the thermometer out. Clean the thermometer with soapy water or rubbing alcohol, then rinse and dry before storing.

Hope this helps.
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Gungnir

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2012, 05:10:04 PM »

im sure there has to be a usb charging thermometer out there somwhere, but in all honesty with how long a digital one last now a days, you only need to pack one, by the time it runs out a child should be long out of the "picky stage" unless your trying to jam it up his ....... that i assume would actually get harder with age (i know theres a rectum, damn near killed em joke in there somewhere)

the charger is more for my 2 way radios, gps (i also have a compase and know how to use it) and for a tablet. Granted paper books are very valueble to have, but do weigh alot. I have downloaded many guides and to print them up would be an absurd amount of weight. I will stick to my SAS guide, and my old survival guide from army cadets. Anything beyond that is just a luxery and nice to have so keeping it on a tablet, with a small light weight solar powered charger seems like a good idea.

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Grog

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BTW what about those with special needs? Walkers or the like? IF traveling on foot say due to washed out roads ot the like, what plans or items would one stock up on? Caches might work, providing that one;s caches were along the intentded route of travel.

Jerry D Young mentions game carts and puts them to good use in his stories. LOcally I have seen young mothers with two kids and groceries using the public light rail systen to get basics done. Hoever the light rain uses electrical power. I can walk where ever I need to go as long as there is some infrastructure in tact.

YOur comments and thought are appreciated.
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Bug out bags for infants.
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2015, 09:48:59 PM »

There are bike trailers / strollers out there, I have a few of them I've picked up over the years (I like the older ones that mount to the seat post). Four wheel garden carts can be had that are anywhere from a couple of feet wide and up, they generally hold 600+ pounds. My cart has a flippable pulling handle so it can be used on a riding lawn mower or pulled by hand, it's maybe two and a half feet wide and will hold 1200 pounds.
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