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Author Topic: Sailboat Options  (Read 1325 times)

Spence

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Sailboat Options
« on: March 04, 2014, 09:18:51 PM »

  I bought a 20' North Sea cruising sloop. It's a deep keel double ender just to give me a summer project. It's a 1980 Nordica with O/B and I got it cheap. Owners of this model have crossed the ocean so it's a seaworthy design. I hope to fix it up and maybe sell it if the sea salt in my veins don't kick in first. It comes with a double axle trailer. Not the easiest to launch from a trailer but doable.

  I began to wonder how it would be a good escape vehicle when the time comes. It can sleep 4. Food is in the water, and I
can sail it to thousands of only water access locations. It's a seasonal thing of course, and living in the south would give it the possibility of a full time shanty. I was thinking of the best remote area in this end of the world, and Labrador is the most inhospitable area with no access roads and reasonable land-to-sea trade winds. Winters are horrible, but I'm used to that here and I'd need a shack. There are native communities in Labrador who have always lived in survivalist situations.  I could fish halibut and cod, and build a shack on the shore and just haul out the boat off season.

Depending on the emergency situation, I think water travel will be the least monitored. Peacetime strict regulations would be dropped until the crisis is solved and keep the pain-in-the-b%$# officials and coast guard occupied with other things. Unless the crisis is marine based, I should see fewer boats than usual, but I absolutely will be on my own with no help available. I'd be tempted to head to Ireland and move in with distant relatives I've never met   ;D. (If it isn't the source of the crisis of course, and there's a possibility of that too).




 




 
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Sailboat Options
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2014, 10:30:22 PM »

Great score. If you're on the sea then having a boat is a good idea and option, especially one that can make ocean voyages.

If I was taking to the sea one of the first things I'd get, and probably the biggest ticket item, would be a manual desalinator. Being able to turn sea water into potable water would be a priority. I'd also get a couple of food grade plastic barrels to store potable water and make a solar still.

The food grade plastic barrels could be used on deck during rain or Silnylon could be used to create a catchment system that would funnel into the barrels via hose. A design that could be hoisted up the mast would be ideal and would offer the largest area. I'd also build a solar still so I could use salt water. I'd get a pressure canner and some copper tube to make a steam distiller. Five gallon food grade buckets would work as well for water storage and general storage.

Of course fishing gear to cover anything that you might find on the sea would be a must, including some gill nets of various sizes. I have a 12 by 4 foot gill net in my survival kit as it is.

I would stock canned food and maybe MREs for those times when a quick meal was needed. I'd add dehydrated and freeze dried food in #10 cans and pouches, they can be stored in water proof containers or coolers, maybe even laquered to save them from salt water corrosion. I'm no fan of sea food, although I do like English Style fish and chips.

I would add at least one bicycle and maybe a trailer for when you were on land. They do make folding mountain bikes that the US military uses and they don't take up much space

Spend the money on a good life raft. A small row boat or canoe that can be rigged with outriggers and a small motor is a good idea, then you can stay off shore and make your way in. A spare motor or at least parts for your out board is always good to have.

I know at 20 feet space is at a premium, but there are still things you want to have. If you have two vehicles a second trailer with the smaller row boat or canoe is possible, or it can go on the roof of your current vehicle or the bed if it is a pickup. If the row boat or canoe has a cover that fits tight it can be towed behind the sail boat like a trailer. Food grade plastic barrels can also be lashed to the deck or towed if need be.

There are nooks and crannies that can be filled with small items like freeze dried food cans or pouches.

I'd operate on the Bug Out Bag with additional sea specific things and plenty of extra food, and a few extras at the least.

I just watched that new Robert Redford movie last week. If you haven't seen it I won't spoil it his troubles start with running into a shipping container and the resulting hole in his boat. If he had taken larger fiberglass patches and glue he would have had less problems. It was a good movie and I highly recommend seeing it if you are planning on being on a boat.
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Spence

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Re: Sailboat Options
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2014, 11:23:45 AM »

Thanks CD. Yeah, the desalinator and panels excellent idea, good thinking. Thing is too that with the small space they take, they put out 10 fold the advantages. I was thinking of the bike, but then there are only back trails and boonies as far as I know. Goose Bay isn't anywhere close. (The terrain looks like something out of that comet explosion in Siberia a few years back). The net is also a great idea. They have inflatables that can be towed in sea crossings and gales.  At 800$ I'll need to come up with the money. Technology today, you figure.

I saw the movie. My 2C, The glass he put on was 1 or 2 layers and spanned 18inches or so. The first wave would have detached the edges if not backed from the inside with something stiff. Gel coat is not the ideal layer for bonding, and in the least would have needed sanding first with 60-80 grit. I don't think I would have gone back to get stores like he did if it was so low in the water, never mind dive for it. At a certain point a boat will hesitate, then plung.

The truck, even though secured would need to be sacrificed with the mobs taking it. Anyway, maybe some dad with kids may need it to make a run for it. It may be one big panic situation, who knows.

Update on the Meds: I got my one pound of Tetra at our country store, no problem or hassals. Could have got bigger packages too. The preferred penn or amox I couldn't see in the case. If anyone got infected I would start with a wash, then mud pack, then if these didn't work an allergy test with just a touch of powder. The dosages and side effects I got online and have it attached to the pack.

thanks for the tips.

 
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Sailboat Options
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2014, 05:36:19 PM »

No problem. I was just throwing out ideas, some of which came to me as I watched the movie.

There is adhesive you can buy that will set in water, I use Permatex Aviation Form-A-Gasket on water pumps, and there others by JB Weld for under water use. With that hole, I would had panels as I suggested, as well as a hand brace and some nuts, bolts and washers. You already have a hole in your boat, adding some more drill holes isn't going to matter much. Plus it allows you to put on a good size patch with the panels. I'd seriously consider some flat metal to add some more stability if the hole was big.

I was thinking about extra storage since that is a limited commodity on a boat. They make deck mounted life rafts in something about the size of a 55 gallon drum. A couple of those would hold a fair amount of gear for if you went down.

Yeah, going back in was risky. I'd make sure I had a bug out, or going down, kit near the main hatch and one near any other hatches so I could grab them easily. At the very least I'd have something along the line of a MOLLE vest with a variety of items I'd need so I could wear it once things got rough or could keep it close at hand.

The bike would depend on your area but would be something to consider if areas you are likely to go may justify it. If all the coasts you're likely to go to are rocky then it doesn't make any sense.
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