Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Don't forget... With the upgrades you can change the theme in your profile.
The "Original" theme is available again. Choose "Old SurvivalistsSite Theme (2.0) for the "Original" theme.



           
The links above will open in a new window.





Would you like to advertise on SurvivalistsSite.com? For more information email ads@survivalistssite.com

Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down

Author Topic: Heavy Duty BOV  (Read 6897 times)

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Heavy Duty BOV
« on: November 20, 2014, 02:15:41 PM »

    Ok I know what most people would say. It's not 4x4 and it will not be able to go everywhere. And to that I say no kidding!!!!! I have a 1984 Ford E350 cargo van. Yep that's right one of those big ugly brutes that Ryder had. This one has been converted by someone to make what you would call a toy hauler out of. It has an area behind the cab that has been converted to living space with an overhead sleeper. The back has extra seating and space. We took out the bench eat and installed a reclining swivel bucket seat and will also install a removable table that will meet may of our needs. We replaced the standard flooring with heavy vinyl tile that will stand up to more wear and tear. Also looks a heck of a lot better too. In the cargo area in the back we recovered the flooring with 3/4" marine plywood and added 1/2" on the sidewalls. To this we added 2 rows of E track on each side and some heavy D rings as well for securing cargo. In the front there is a window on one side that when I am using it for a work truck I cover from the inside so no one sees the cargo inside. I also added a wire tool rack and a cabinet out of an old utility van to hold tools and supplies so they don't roll all over the place. With the length of the cargo bed at over 10' I could almost drive a small car inside. I have measured and I could get 2 full dress Harleys in the back but I don't need those kind of toys. The roll p door in the back is going to get some new weather seals to keep the dust out. I also have a ladder in the rear that goes to the roof and I think I may build a roof rack for it in the future. I am also thinking about adding some locking wire channel on the sides as well as the rear to be able to fasten tarp material to for extra shade. This would also work well f you added side walls for living and storage space. This truck has a ell of a large trailering package as well and I plan on pulling a 20' flatbed trailer when neede3d. I have hauled over 3 cords of wood on behind the old girl and you don't even know it's there. Gas mileage really sucks at 8 miles full or empty but I don't plan on moving across the US if SHTF either. I do know one thing with the extra overload springs and shocks and heavy duty tires I can haul a lot in one trip. LOL load the van with tools and supplies. Load the trailer with the small tractor and skid loader and I have lots of potential when I get to a new place. I would say that if we had to relocate to our secondary location with what I would carry in this rig plus what would be carried behind the pickup and the enclosed horse trailer it would pull plus the youngest son and his rig there is very little we would want for. Hopefully hen I get this set up like I want I will take some pictures and figure out how to attach them so others can see.
Logged

Gungnir

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 472
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2014, 05:25:16 PM »

4x4 isnt always important.  If you dont need it to get to our bol, then its needed even less, if your hauling a small tractor behind you then you dont need it all. Best of all from the outside ou just look like a farmer going for a trip, perfect camouflage.  I converted an ol cherokee to somthing like that for a buddy. We cut the top off and welded on one of those camper van tops.
Logged

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2014, 06:59:13 PM »

    I was reading a blog on stealth camping and I thought it was really cool how a guy who had a basic white van with a ladder rack always parked in different parking lots around a city and never even got a look from the police due to the fact they thought he looked just like a contractor and didn't raise any red flags. I saw some very interesting adaptations for power and I think some of the ideas of adding solar panels and extra batteries was a heck of a good idea. When you have as much roof area as I have on this van you could have a  huge solar panel capacity up there. I mean who would even see it???? It would lay flat between a empty roof rack and the roof is at least 9" up so it would be pretty well hidden. You could build a rack for extra batteries under the box floor with an access point from the inside to service them so that wouldn't be much of a problem either. Darn I get too many good ideas and now all I need is the time and money. LOL what's money?????
Logged

Gungnir

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 472
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2014, 07:27:21 PM »

We got people who live in parking lots in rv's here. I had so e door magnets made up for my jeep with the name of a bullshit serveyor compony name and logo on em so I can cruse the trails with out geting shit on by the cops.
Logged

Canuck In Denver

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3747
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2014, 08:35:36 PM »

Sounds like it will work well. On the subject of 4x4, you could add it you know :)

I've thought about getting an old ambulance, great camo if you have an EMT uniform. An ambulance in route to a hospital or to pick someone up will be able to get through a police road block when someone else can't... especially if it has the name of one of those long distant transport ones.
Logged
My SurvivalistsSite.com Blog: http://blogs.survivalistssite.com/blog/canuck.php
My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page: www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/
My Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics Guide (ebook): www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/downloads/canucks_ebook.pdf

 Want a FREE Blog or Community Page? Contact me by PM or email. 

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2014, 07:52:28 PM »

    You guys have some pretty good ideas. I have to laugh maybe we could get some signs that state we are doing governmental studies on global warming or the sex lives of frogs. The idea with the door stickers would tend to work as well as not. My only problem is in a small community there are very few places to stealth camp due to size. The bigger the town or city the easier it would be to blend in. I think one of the best urban tricks would be to hide in plain sight. You also realize to that folks that live in the sticks keep a pretty close eye on what goes on in their area and tend to know all the cars and trucks of those who live there. I guess we aren't too shy about stopping and checking things out. When we see a car at a place we don't think it belongs we check them out. That's one of the reason hen they use to cook Meth in our area they moved on because they couldn't get any privacy. All you had to do was stop about 300 yards away and watch and they would bug out.
Logged

Sustainablehome

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1065
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page:
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2014, 10:46:36 AM »

We used to have "johns" who would park on our little street to conduct business.  Stopped real quick when they would get a flashlight to the face. 

I like the van idea.  The heavier duty, the better.  AND 4x4 ... well, if you KNOW you'll need it, it's great but I was told that for things like ice/low amounts of snow, front wheel drive is better.  The man who told me that used to gripe because his wife insisted on a little 4x4 truck (Toyota?  Don't remember) and they'd always have to weigh down the bed of the truck in order to get traction.  I've never lived in snow/ice conditions so I wouldn't know. 

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2014, 12:46:35 PM »

   The gross weight on this van is just under 6000 lbs so no special CDL is needed and if you load it the better traction you get on bad roads. It still is like a pig on ice and you have to be careful. In the wind it's high profile is a pain in the butt however loaded and with a trailer behind it's just fine. Gas mileage really sucks around 8 MPG. But if your only going 100 miles or so nota problem. The dual tanks help increase the range with a 16gallon front tank ad a 22 gallon rear you will be able to travel 300 miles. The Ford 460motor is bullet proof and the heavy duty rear end an transmission are built the same. One of the best things to remember is that rental companies like Ryder used only what would hold up to repeated abuse and misuse by their customers. Companies like U haul bought the cheapest and when they were done with them they were for the most part junk. As for 4x4 it could be done but I really don't think it would prove to be worth the dollars invested. I would figure if you were loaded with what you would need including the trailer and it's load you could carry around 8000 lbs of supplies and equipment and not have a problem. As for being the perfect BOV I don't think there has been one made that any of us could afford. These trucks used run around $6000 and are a cheap dependable van. I guess I have a lot to do to set tis up for life in the sticks if I were to bug out but the cost would be minimal and the rig would look fairly normal going down the road. It is ones benefit not to draw unwanted attention and with this type of van you should be OK.
Logged

Canuck In Denver

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3747
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2014, 11:02:33 PM »

I hate front wheel drive. I like rear wheel drive personally.

The deal with the extra weight in the rear of the pickup affects all pickups. My suburban has better traction than a 1500 Sierra pickup because I have more body weight and a lot more over the rear tires. Front wheel drive doesn't need the extra weight in the back because most of the weight is already over the drive wheels. Putting into 4x4 should solve most of the problems and make that little pickup handle better than if it was front wheel drive.

Front wheel drive is nice in that the rest of the car is pulled while in rear wheel drive you're pushing the rest of the car. Fishtailing in a rear wheel drive is easy enough to deal with, in a front wheel drive it can be a whole other ball game and can actually be a lot worse.

I guess for the most part FWD/RWD is a preference, I won't say it's 50/50 because I think RWD is better all around so 45/55 or 40/60 but that is my opinion.
Logged
My SurvivalistsSite.com Blog: http://blogs.survivalistssite.com/blog/canuck.php
My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page: www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/
My Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics Guide (ebook): www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/downloads/canucks_ebook.pdf

 Want a FREE Blog or Community Page? Contact me by PM or email. 

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2014, 12:09:05 PM »

    I was looking at a stealth camping sight and if you used a truck or a van like this you would fit in pretty well as you could also blend in better. I was amazed at some of the set ups these guys had done with their vans. Looks to me as if there are a lot of road gypsies out there that we weren't aware of.
Logged

Sustainablehome

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1065
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page:
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2014, 12:29:21 PM »

Yes, there are.  There are entire communities who communicate online (and I'm sure in other ways, like Ham), help each other, meet-up, etc.

Canuck In Denver

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3747
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2014, 10:34:44 PM »

You can keep a lot more in a van then you can in your back pack, so you could actually have a fair amount of stuff and be pretty damn comfortable.

There have always been people who travel place to place and there always will be. My daughter was talking about getting a VW van so she could travel around. I told her before she did that to find a VW with either a dead engine or barely running engine and bring it here so we can swap in a 350 or something to give her power. And she'd learn how to use firearms. I was surprised when she agreed that knowing how to use a gun and having one with her would be a good thing.
Logged
My SurvivalistsSite.com Blog: http://blogs.survivalistssite.com/blog/canuck.php
My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page: www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/
My Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics Guide (ebook): www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/downloads/canucks_ebook.pdf

 Want a FREE Blog or Community Page? Contact me by PM or email. 

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2014, 09:01:40 AM »

    Damn Canuck your girl seems to be way ahead of the learning curve. Not picking on women but they need to learn defensive driving skills more than men due to the fact of being more of a target for the bad guys due to their gender. You have a great opportunity to teach her those skills.
Logged

Canuck In Denver

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3747
    • View Profile
    • My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2014, 08:52:35 PM »

My daughter lives in Colorado, which is a bit of a drive from Fargo. But yeah, living in the city has taught her that there are dirt bags out there. She's about 5 foot / 5 foot 2 and about 100 pounds so there isn't much to her. But she has my temper and her mother's temper... her mother was escorted out of a bar once because some guy was groping her, she told him to stop and when he kept it up she turned around and belted him which broke his jaw and knocked him out. Her mother is about 5 foot 4.

As for my temper, lets just say when it goes I don't remember anything and people get hurt... so I keep a very tight leash on it. I've been told it's scary when I lose it... I don't remember so I have no idea.
Logged
My SurvivalistsSite.com Blog: http://blogs.survivalistssite.com/blog/canuck.php
My SurvivalistsSite.com Community Page: www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/
My Emergency Preparedness and Survival Basics Guide (ebook): www.survivalistssite.com/~canuck/downloads/canucks_ebook.pdf

 Want a FREE Blog or Community Page? Contact me by PM or email. 

Hiddenone

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 300
  • You Got To Be Kidding!
    • View Profile
Re: Heavy Duty BOV
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2014, 06:17:58 PM »

  OK was a nice day out yesterday so I went out to the old E350 and cleaned the back out and decided to do some revamping. I have 2 levels of E track on both sides of the box and have a bunch of different fittings for it that I picked up over the last couple of years from Northern. Decided if I am going to have some shelving in it I would make it semi permanent but quickly removable. Use some 2x4's for the frame work and fastened it to some E track brackets. Looks real good and it would only take 8 screws and it can be removable. I think I could take it out or put it in by myself in under 10 minutes with no problem. This will allow for more storage along the sides and free up floor space. Using the wheel wells along the sides under the shelving I have plenty of room for boards 10 long and can close the rear cargo door. If I like this I may make another set for the other side of the box too. The shelves are 2 levels and are 80" long by 28" deep plenty of room for storage totes, boxes or loose items. As I have a lip around the front and sides of the shelves nothing is going to fall off and that will be very handy. The first shelf is 22" off the floor and the second is 26" above that. If I want I may build the one on the other side 6' tall and have 3 shelves. That would still leave me with a 3' aisle down the center of the cargo area as well as 3' of room across the front of the cargo area. Wish I had better internet as I would take some photos so you could see how it looks.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up