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Author Topic: Wiggy's sleeping bag  (Read 132 times)

Canuck In Denver

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Wiggy's sleeping bag
« on: June 09, 2018, 12:19:38 AM »

The other weekend some friends and I had our annual camping trip, a bit shorter than usual. but still some time away. I bought a Wiggy's "Slumber Bag" rated for 50F since I wanted a summer bag. I slept in my tent as usual, on a cot with a thin foam mat instead of my usual memory foam pad. It rained for much of the weekend and it was damp at night when it wasn't raining. The temps were a little under 50F.

The first night I climbed in with a T-shirt and was a bit chilled, not cold but not toasty warm. Sleeping on my side it was my upper back, shoulder, chest area that was chilled while the rest was warm. I figure it was partially the open top since the bag doesn't have a hood and partially being a bit under the rating.

The next day it was rainy and a bit below the previous night's temp. Late in the afternoon I decided to take a nap and skipped the T-shirt. Not having the T shirt made an improvement, if the temp had been a degree higher I would have been toasty.

That night it was at best 45F when I crawled into bed (way past midnight) and I decided to grab a light fleece blanket I had and keep it over the sleeping bag. I made sure to really tuck it in around my shoulders. The fleece was a bit much, I was a bit past toasty, but I slept well anyway.

The sleeping bag is thin and light. In the compression sack it will be about the size of a basket ball. A thin twin sized fleece blanket is about the same weight and the same size in the compression sack. The sleeping bag is 36x84 with a listed weight of 2.75 pounds. My Coleman that has a similar rating and is 40x84 weighs quite a bit more and is much thicker.

All-in-all the temp claims were accurate. The insulation in all Wiggy's products will keep you warm even when wet, in fact the insulation will dry with your body heat. With everything else damp around me the sleeping bag was nice and dry when I woke up. I washed the sleeping bag when it got here, and I washed it after my camping trip, the insulation stayed right were it is suppose to unlike every other sleeping bag I've washed and I don't buy cheap sleeping bags.

I can say that I'm happy with the Wiggy's summer sleeping bag (Slumber Bag) and I will be buying one of his FTRSS systems for colder temps. The price is good for the quality and the lifetime warranty. Being able to wash the sleeping bags as often as I want and not have the insulation move is a major bonus.
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Darren

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Re: Wiggy's sleeping bag
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2018, 08:30:01 PM »

Haven't heard of this brand. Where did you pick it up?
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Canuck In Denver

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Re: Wiggy's sleeping bag
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2018, 10:26:44 PM »

www.wiggys.com They are made in Grand Junction, Colorado.

I heard about them in the mid to late 80s. The US Navy SEALs were buying them with their own money because they worked as advertised and when wet, there was a write up in a magazine I was reading (don't remember which one). Over the years I've heard from a few people who had them and really liked them. They are also standard equipment in all US Airforce planes as survival equipment. They have a NSN and can be requested by any US service member.

He's sold quite a few to Canadian military as well, personal purchase again because they work. I think there may even be a Canadian stock number for them, but I'm not sure.

Several of his products are in wide use, including his hypothermia bags which are used in Canadian SAR operations and others.

I also have one of his "jacket liners" which was my first purchase to test the insulation, the same insulation is used in all Wiggy's products. Late last fall I bought a parka since my old Canadian military parka and my Cabela's down parka were getting on in years and needing replacing. I did a test of all three parkas and the Wiggy's won, I took into account the cold spot in the Cabela's. The Canadian military parka's issue is the shell - seams are starting to fray but the liner still works as well as it ever did (says made in 1979, I bought it about 30 years ago), for a nearly 40 year old parka I'm impressed with how well it's survived.
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